WWFest: YR1
LIVE
PRODUCTION
MUSIC
ART DIRECTION
MOTION DESIGN
RIOT GAMES / AMAZON
-
2022
LIVE
PRODUCTION
MUSIC
ART DIRECTION
MOTION DESIGN

The Challenge:

Create an international, livestream music festival that spans five countries over six hours to to celebrate Valorant's one-year anniversary.

The Approach:

At the time of its production, WWFest: YR1 was the most ambitious live music stream that had ever happened. It was our second installment of Valorant's online music festival, so we knew we had to go bigger and badder than the previous year. This time, we met our talent where they were, traveling to countries that are home to five of the game's characters and capturing live performances from musicians who not only represent Valorant's sound, but are known reps of their home cities. We wanted to allow chat to influence the stream with dynamic interactivity, so we built a first-of-it's kind system where live chat could control visual FX in real-time by using certain keywords.

The Result:

Over the six hour stream, we broadcasted live sets from Mexico City, Seoul, Dubai, Berlin, and Los Angeles. We produced 5 minute mini-docs to introduce each city, complete with custom music scores and a premium graphics package to match. Hundreds of thousands of live viewers tuned in to join the party, and the landscape of livestream music festivals on Twitch was never the same.

WWFEST: YR1 Recap

Tyler Herro

We went to Maimi to meet up with Tyler Herro, point guard / small forward for the Miami Heat. We captured his routine around the house, getting in the zone, enjoying the bright streets of his city, and hitting the gym for some shooting practice. We captured sounds around him house, his car, his serene backyard, and of course, on the court. We passed these field recordings over to music producer Supa Dups to flip them into Tyler's Signature Sound.

Anthony Edwards

We went to Atlanta to meet up with "Ant-Man" Anthony Edwards, shooting guard / small forward for the Minnesota Timberwolves. We captured him hanging out at home, getting lined up, hanging with his dog, and, of course, getting some shooting practice in. We captured the sounds of his world before passing them to music producer Beam and Ant-Man's own brother bdifferent to craft the custom track.

JaMarr Chase

We caught up with Cincinnati Bengals' wide receiver Jamarr Chase. We captured his routine of practicing gratitude, staying goal oriented and staying in shape. Jamarr's sounds were unique to the series in that many of them were delicate and organic to reflect his mindful and poised nature. We sent the sounds off to music producer Kaycyy to craft them into Jamarr's Signature Sound.

Christian Pulisic

We crossed the pond to meet up with Christian Pulisic, then-midfielder for Chelsea F.C. Being an American playing for Chelsea, we had a unique opportunity to capture Christian's story of staying focussed in a foreign place, finding new inspiration on and off the pitch, and never forgetting his roots. We teamed up with Cristian's friend, musician Quinn XCII to compose his anthemic Signature Sound.

Justin Jefferson

We met Minnesota Viking's wide receiver Justin "Jets" Jefferson at his home-away-from-home where he took us through his routine of staying in shape, gaming with his friends, and keeping a positive mental attitude. We even got lucky enough to catch an airplane flying over Jets' head while chillin by the pool. We passed our field records to music producer Kaycyy to build Justin's upbeat Signature Sound.

Rivalry: Bet On Esports

For their Canadian launch, Rivalry wanted to focus on their primary niche - Esports. We jumped into Unreal Engine to create a slew of wacky game maps and cinematics that captue the same level of energy as winning a massive online bet.

Rivalry: Bet On Sports - Basketball

For their Spanish and Brazilian launch, Rivalry wanted to focus on traditional sports. We created two spots that repurposed the popular bar meme into a wonky world of 3D game characters celebrating a game winning moment.

Rivalry: Bet On Sports - Hockey

For their Spanish and Brazilian launch, Rivalry wanted to focus on traditional sports. We created two spots that repurposed the popular bar meme into a wonky world of 3D game characters celebrating a game winning moment.

Ep01: Quarton Farm

In the United States, 97% of farms are family owned and 64% of all vegetables sales come from very large farms. Kellie is one of the few whose farm falls in neither of those categories. She’s a first-generation vegetable farmer working on just 20 acres of land. Throughout her episode, she highlights the struggles of owning a farm while renting the land and what it takes to run a business by herself that is rooted in nourishing others.

Ep02: Choy Division

Christina’s farm sits on just half an acre in Chester County, yet its impact is one of outsized proportions. With a focus on growing East Asian heritage crops, Christina provides hundreds of New Yorkers with the right to not just healthy, locally grown foods, but foods with cultural importance – a key factor in true food sovereignty. Her episode outlines the importance of providing choice and what those choices truly mean to a community.

Ep03: Rock Steady Farm

Rock Steady’s business model is rooted in food access, social justice, and farmer training. As a queer, co-operative vegetable farm, they work incredibly hard to offer food to overlooked communities through sliding scale payments, community partnerships, and public food access programs. This episode is all about the power of community both on the farm and off.

Ep04: Brooklyn Packers

Raina Kennedy works hand in hand with local farmers to source fresh produce for Brooklyn Packers – a black-led, worker-owned cooperative based in Bed-stuy. Throughout this episode, we witness the ways in which access to fresh produce is segmented across the city and what Brooklyn Packers is doing to bridge the gap. 

Ep05: Babetown

Alex Koones is a queer community organizer and chef. She is also the founder of New York’s queer supper club, Babetown. In the final episode of the series, we finally sit down to a meal, now with a deeper appreciation of what it means to be a part of a community, get food to the table, and share a meal.

Built for Live

A live broadcast heavily relies on the talent's ability to carry the show. We developed the Creator Mode to evolve over two hours from comfortable and familiar to zany and chaotic - allowing our talent to ease into the show and give the best performance possible.

Three Mode Structure

Our three “modes” were punctuated by gameplay segments, grounding our creators in their most familiar element, but the magic was in the moments they were forced out of their comfort zone into the world of Creator Mode.

A-Block: Chat Mode

Just Chatting between all cast focused on one main topic. Episode 3 featured a discussion on fan interactions.

B-Block: Offline Mode

Familiar party games away from the screen. Episode 2 featured a twist on Pin the Tail on the Donkey called "Look at This Photograph."

C-Block: Creator Mode

Unpredictable custom games with chat participation. Episode 4 had guests ranking the best potato dishes - disagreements were settled with a spicy punishment.

Production Design

The set of Creator Mode struck a balance between talk show and clubhouse hangout - encouraging interaction and movement within the space and specifically designed to support each programming block.

We looked to 90s tv shows with immersive sets, like Pee Wee’s Playhouse or Sesame Street, and combined that with the laid-back nature of today’s talk shows, like Ridiculousness or The Graham Norton Show. All to give Myth an authentic space to call his own and invite other creators to hang out the old fashioned way – IRL.

Art Direction

Inspired by the Y2K aesthetic, GenX Hackers, and Retro Tech, we crafted a cohesive branding aesthetic that seamlessly blends familiarity with modernity. Our approach involved integrating pivotal elements into the furniture design, incorporating status bars and iconic imagery that not only represented the essence of the show but also paid homage to the golden era of hacking. We embraced the nostalgia of yesteryears by infusing characters reminiscent of rotary dials and graphics reminiscent of the operating systems utilized by hackers in the 90s.

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